Moscow’s Invisible Grassroots

Moscow’s Invisible Grassroots

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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The round of voting that a few of Russia’s regions had last Sunday was both dull and promising. The elections, the majority of them regional and local, were non-competitive in most places and served the purpose of legitimizing Kremlin’s appointees…

Regulating Faiths: Make Your Preaching Legal

Regulating Faiths: Make Your Preaching Legal

Roman Lunkin

Roman Lunkin

Senior Researcher at Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences
Roman Lunkin, head of the Center for Religious Studies in the Institute of Europe (Russian Academy of Sciences), member of Russian team of Keston Institute (Oxford, UK) project “Encyclopedia of religious life in Russia Today”, editor-in-chief of the web-portal “Religion and Law” (www.sclj.ru), Public policy scholar in Woodrow Wilson Center and Kennan Institute (2011), The Galina Starovoitova Fellowship scholar of Kennan Institute (2017).
Roman Lunkin

Latest posts by Roman Lunkin (see all)

BY ROMAN LUNKIN Just ten years ago it would have been hard to imagine that the crackdown on civic activism in Russia would target religious communities, not just NGOs. And yet it is happening. The Russian state persecutes Baptists, Pentecostals,…

A View from the South: Reflections on Dagestan

A View from the South: Reflections on Dagestan

Edward C. Holland

Edward C. Holland

Edward C. Holland is Assistant Professor of Geography in the Department of Geosciences at the University of Arkansas. His research interests range across a variety of topics, including political violence, religion, and critical geopolitics, and are generally focused on the Russian Federation. He has recently published on these topics in Problems of Post-Communism, Europe-Asia Studies, and forthcoming in the Annals of the American Association of Geographers. He was lead editor on Questioning Post-Soviet, published by the Kennan Institute to mark the 25th anniversary of the USSR's breakup.
Edward C. Holland

Latest posts by Edward C. Holland (see all)

BY EDWARD C. HOLLAND In Dagestan’s capital of Makhachkala, a wind from the north is called an Ivan, from the south a Mohammed. These names underscore the liminal position of the republic between Russia’s Orthodox core and the Muslim Middle…

Moscow’s Facelift as Modernization

Moscow’s Facelift as Modernization

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV Central Moscow has been a scene of digging and dredging for about three years now. Muscovites have gone from denial, anger, bargaining, all the way to acceptance. The current mood in Moscow: “We are in this forever.”…

Americans in the USSR: Changing Hearts and Minds in the Midst of the Cold War

Americans in the USSR: Changing Hearts and Minds in the Midst of the Cold War

Izabella Tabarovsky

Izabella Tabarovsky

Senior Associate, Manager for Regional Engagement at The Kennan Institute
Izabella Tabarovsky's research interests focus on issues of historical memory and national reconciliation in the post-Soviet space and Eastern Europe. Prior to the Kennan Institute, she worked at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where she led the implementation of the Euro-Atlantic Security–Next Generation initiative (EASI Next Generation), managed a Track 2 Transnistria conflict resolution task force, and a U.S.-Russian health cooperation task force.
Izabella holds a Master of Arts degree in Russian History from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Colorado in Boulder. She is a native Russian speaker with working knowledge of Hebrew, Spanish, French, and German.
Izabella Tabarovsky

BY IZABELLA TABAROVSKY This blog is a short version of a Wilson Quarterly article Walking in Each Other’s Shoes. In my Siberian hometown of Novosibirsk, the chances of walking out onto the street in 1977 and running into a living,…

Kazan: In Search of a Recipe for Its Melting Pot

Kazan: In Search of a Recipe for Its Melting Pot

Liliya Karimova

Liliya Karimova

Professorial Lecturer at Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication, the George Washington University
Liliya Karimova received her Ph.D. in Communication from UMASS-Amherst. She is currently an independent researcher and a Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication at the George Washington University, Washington, DC. She has published in Nova Religio: the Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions; The Journal of Intercultural Communication Research; Central Asian Survey; Central Asian Affairs, Anthropology and Archaeology of Eurasia. Her research focuses on women, identity, piety, Islam, space, and discourse in Tatarstan, Russia.
Liliya Karimova

BY LILIYA KARIMOVA Kazan, Russia, has a rich history dating back to centuries before the Russian conquest in the 1550s. This history combines early pre-Islamic elements, a Muslim heritage that began with the conversion to Islam around the eight century,…

Russia’s Muslims Are as Diverse as Their Experiences

Russia’s Muslims Are as Diverse as Their Experiences

Liliya Karimova

Liliya Karimova

Professorial Lecturer at Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication, the George Washington University
Liliya Karimova received her Ph.D. in Communication from UMASS-Amherst. She is currently an independent researcher and a Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication at the George Washington University, Washington, DC. She has published in Nova Religio: the Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions; The Journal of Intercultural Communication Research; Central Asian Survey; Central Asian Affairs, Anthropology and Archaeology of Eurasia. Her research focuses on women, identity, piety, Islam, space, and discourse in Tatarstan, Russia.
Liliya Karimova

BY LILIYA KARIMOVA Russia’s current Muslim population is estimated at about 15 million, accounting for about 10 percent of the country’s total population. These numbers do not include about 4–5 million migrant workers, predominantly from Central Asia. A number of…

Russian Truck Drivers against the Platon Tax, Round 2

Russian Truck Drivers against the Platon Tax, Round 2

Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

Senior Researcher at Center for Independent Social Research
Irina Olimpieva works at the Center for Independent Social Research, St. Petersburg, Russia as a senior researcher and the Head of the Research Department “Social Studies of the Economy”. She received her PhD in Economic Sociology from the St. Petersburg State University of Economics and Finance. Her basic research interests are in the field of economic sociology with a particular focus on post-socialist transformation.
Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

Latest posts by Irina Meyer (Olimpieva) (see all)

The new round of truck drivers’ strike shows signs of politicization of economic protest in Russia BY IRINA MEYER (OLIMPIEVA) On March 27, Russia’s long-haul truck drivers announced an indefinite nationwide strike against the toll collection system Platon. The system…

Crimea As a Glimpse into a Post-American World

Crimea As a Glimpse into a Post-American World

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TROBOLYUBOV One explanation for Russia’s president Vladimir Putin’s momentous decision, three years ago, to go into Ukraine and annex Crimea is that he sensed an opening. (March 18, 2014, is the date officially considered the day of admission…

Ya Heart Vladimir: A Visit to the Regions

Ya Heart Vladimir: A Visit to the Regions

Liz Malinkin

Liz Malinkin

Mary Elizabeth Malinkin is a Program Associate at the Kennan Institute of the Woodrow Wilson Center (2007-present). After graduating from Carleton College with a B.A. in history, she lived in Vladimir, Russia for two years and studied Russian language, literature, history, and politics at Vladimir State Pedagogical University. Ms. Malinkin received an M.A. in Russian and East European Studies at the University of Michigan after writing her thesis on ethnic minorities in the Moscow workforce. Her current research focuses on migration issues in Russia and Eurasia and her articles have appeared in Kennan Institute publications as well as The National Interest. She has participated in a US-Russia working group on migration, and in 2014 received an Advanced Practitioner Fellowship as part of the US-Russia Social Expertise Exchange.
Liz Malinkin

Latest posts by Liz Malinkin (see all)

By Mary Elizabeth Malinkin Giant, Cyrillic block letters spelling “Ya Heart Vladimir” (“I Love Vladimir”) now illuminate Cathedral Square in downtown Vladimir, Russia. The cheery, familiar slogan brought a smile to my face – da, ya lyublyu Vladimir. In early…