Regulating Faiths: Make Your Preaching Legal

Regulating Faiths: Make Your Preaching Legal

Roman Lunkin

Roman Lunkin

Senior Researcher at Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences
Roman Lunkin, head of the Center for Religious Studies in the Institute of Europe (Russian Academy of Sciences), member of Russian team of Keston Institute (Oxford, UK) project “Encyclopedia of religious life in Russia Today”, editor-in-chief of the web-portal “Religion and Law” (www.sclj.ru), Public policy scholar in Woodrow Wilson Center and Kennan Institute (2011), The Galina Starovoitova Fellowship scholar of Kennan Institute (2017).
Roman Lunkin

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BY ROMAN LUNKIN Just ten years ago it would have been hard to imagine that the crackdown on civic activism in Russia would target religious communities, not just NGOs. And yet it is happening. The Russian state persecutes Baptists, Pentecostals,…

What’s in a Name? The Kremlin’s Political Strategy, That’s What

What’s in a Name? The Kremlin’s Political Strategy, That’s What

Alice Underwood

Alice Underwood

Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University
Alice is a Title VIII Scholar at the Kennan Institute, where her research consists of exploring Russian concepts of morality as constructed by political discourse and enforced by legislation. As a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University in the Department of Comparative Literature, Alice writes about Soviet and Russian citizenship through such frameworks as the iconography of leadership, the mythos of the New Soviet Man, constitutional law, and deviant artworks responding to imposed civil and physical ways of being. Her approach encompasses political science, history, and anthropology as well as literary analysis. Alice holds an A.B. from Harvard University, where she graduated with a degree in Slavic Literatures and Cultures and a secondary field in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.
Alice Underwood

BY ALICE E. M. UNDERWOOD Parents who think names like Princess Daniella, Tsar, and BOCH rVF 260602 have a nice ring to them are out of luck. A new law prohibits giving children names that include numbers, combinations of numbers…

Cultural Undercurrents in the Post-Soviet Space

Cultural Undercurrents in the Post-Soviet Space

Philipp Lottholz

Philipp Lottholz

Doctoral Candidate at International Development Department, University of Birmingham
Doctoral candidate at the International Development Department, University of Birmingham. His publications on post-Soviet transition and state-society relations have appeared, among others, in Cambridge Review of International Affairs in the collection Hybridity: Law, Culture and Development.
Philipp Lottholz

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By PHILIPP LOTTHOLZ This article first appeared on Intersection. Oral histories are emerging as a useful way for analysts to get beyond the façade of high politics, public discourse, and popular protests in the post-Soviet space. Most analytical work on Russia…

Russian Social Sciences under State Pressure

Russian Social Sciences under State Pressure

Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

Senior Researcher at Center for Independent Social Research
Irina Olimpieva works at the Center for Independent Social Research, St. Petersburg, Russia as a senior researcher and the Head of the Research Department “Social Studies of the Economy”. She received her PhD in Economic Sociology from the St. Petersburg State University of Economics and Finance. Her basic research interests are in the field of economic sociology with a particular focus on post-socialist transformation.
Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

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BY IRINA MEYER (OLIMPIEVA) On June 23, 2017, the Board of Trustees of the European University in St. Petersburg accepted the resignation of the rector, Oleg Kharkhordin. The EUSP is a private (non-state) Russian university operating as a graduate school…

Bridging the Red-White Divide Is a Home Run for Putin

Bridging the Red-White Divide Is a Home Run for Putin

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV In an event infused with historical and moral significance, His Holiness Patriarch Kirill, head of the Russian Orthodox Church, consecrated a church late last week that would commemorate the suffering of the Orthodox believers persecuted by the…

Russia’s Muslims Are as Diverse as Their Experiences

Russia’s Muslims Are as Diverse as Their Experiences

Liliya Karimova

Liliya Karimova

Professorial Lecturer at Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication, the George Washington University
Liliya Karimova received her Ph.D. in Communication from UMASS-Amherst. She is currently an independent researcher and a Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication at the George Washington University, Washington, DC. She has published in Nova Religio: the Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions; The Journal of Intercultural Communication Research; Central Asian Survey; Central Asian Affairs, Anthropology and Archaeology of Eurasia. Her research focuses on women, identity, piety, Islam, space, and discourse in Tatarstan, Russia.
Liliya Karimova

BY LILIYA KARIMOVA Russia’s current Muslim population is estimated at about 15 million, accounting for about 10 percent of the country’s total population. These numbers do not include about 4–5 million migrant workers, predominantly from Central Asia. A number of…

Moscow’s Main Agent Is Hype

Moscow’s Main Agent Is Hype

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV In an election seen by many in Europe as a referendum of sorts on the future of a united Europe, Russia openly embraced the anti-EU side, France’s far-right Front National (FN), led by Marine Le Pen. And…

Russia’s Imaginary Stalin

Russia’s Imaginary Stalin

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV Joseph Stalin, a Bolshevik who assumed dictatorial powers over the Soviet Union in the late 1920s and ruled until his death in 1953, is Russia’s most popular revolutionary. Stalin’s popularity as a historical figure is now at…

Russia’s Exceptional Diaspora

Russia’s Exceptional Diaspora

Vladislav Inozemtsev

Vladislav Inozemtsev

Vladislav Inozemtsev is a Russian economist. He is the director and founder of the Center for Post-Industrial Studies in Moscow, a nonprofit institution that specializes in organizing conferences on global economic issues and publishing books. Inozemtsev is a member of the Academic Board of the Russian International Affairs Council; a visiting fellow at CSIS and the Atlantic Council, Washington D.C.; visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University, Washington D.C. He has also taught at various universities, including MGIMO (the University of International Relations) and at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. From 2002 to 2009, he was head of the Scientific Advisory Board of the journal Russia in Global Affairs. Dr. Inozemtsev is the author of 15 monographs, 4 of which have been translated into English, and over 2000 articles in print media and academic journals published in Russia, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
Vladislav Inozemtsev

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BY VLADISLAV INOZEMTSEV This article first appeared on Intersection. Why aren’t many Russian émigrés willing to contribute to their former homeland? I was reminded of a striking difference between Russia and Israel when I walked past a Washington synagogue this…

A Five-Story Story

A Five-Story Story

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV Up to 1.6 million Muscovites live in worn-out dwellings that are beyond repair, the mayor of Moscow Sergey Sobyanin told President Vladimir Putin during their televised meeting last week. “Well, these building have to be razed and…