A National Reconciliation According To Putin

A National Reconciliation According To Putin

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV It is not just the fate of Vladimir Lenin’s body, lying embalmed in a ziggurat-shaped tomb in the middle of Moscow’s Red Square, that is haunting Russia’s relationship with its history. The remains of Russia’s last czar,…

1917: The Empire’s Diverging Revolutions

1917: The Empire’s Diverging Revolutions

Mark von Hagen

Mark von Hagen

Interim Director at , Melikian Center for Russian, Eurasian and East European Studies
Mark von Hagen is Interim Director, Melikian Center for Russian, Eurasian and East European Studies; Professor of History and Global Studies at the School of International Letters and Cultures, School of Politics and Global Studies, Arizona State University; and Dean, Philosophy Faculty at the Ukrainian Free University (Munich, Germany).
Mark von Hagen

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BY MARK VON HAGEN We have long acknowledged and taught that 1917 was not one but many revolutions, including parallel, sometimes overlapping, but often conflicting movements of soldiers, workers, peasants, white-collar workers, and other intelligentsia and social groups. But all…

The Russian State’s Lost Birth Certificate

The Russian State’s Lost Birth Certificate

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV The centennial of the Russian revolution is not a big thing in modern Russia. It feels like an obscure old holiday or a literary anniversary known only to the initiated. It is no longer a historical event…

Why Lenin’s Corpse Lives On In Putin’s Russia

Why Lenin’s Corpse Lives On In Putin’s Russia

Alice Underwood

Alice Underwood

Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University
Alice is a Title VIII Scholar at the Kennan Institute, where her research consists of exploring Russian concepts of morality as constructed by political discourse and enforced by legislation. As a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University in the Department of Comparative Literature, Alice writes about Soviet and Russian citizenship through such frameworks as the iconography of leadership, the mythos of the New Soviet Man, constitutional law, and deviant artworks responding to imposed civil and physical ways of being. Her approach encompasses political science, history, and anthropology as well as literary analysis. Alice holds an A.B. from Harvard University, where she graduated with a degree in Slavic Literatures and Cultures and a secondary field in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.
Alice Underwood

BY ALICE E.M. UNDERWOOD It’s not every society whose ideals are embodied by a corpse. But in the Soviet Union, the never-decaying body of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin was meant to freeze his ideals in time: a promise to citizens that…

Cultural Undercurrents in the Post-Soviet Space

Cultural Undercurrents in the Post-Soviet Space

Philipp Lottholz

Philipp Lottholz

Doctoral Candidate at International Development Department, University of Birmingham
Doctoral candidate at the International Development Department, University of Birmingham. His publications on post-Soviet transition and state-society relations have appeared, among others, in Cambridge Review of International Affairs in the collection Hybridity: Law, Culture and Development.
Philipp Lottholz

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By PHILIPP LOTTHOLZ This article first appeared on Intersection. Oral histories are emerging as a useful way for analysts to get beyond the façade of high politics, public discourse, and popular protests in the post-Soviet space. Most analytical work on Russia…

Kazan: In Search of a Recipe for Its Melting Pot

Kazan: In Search of a Recipe for Its Melting Pot

Liliya Karimova

Liliya Karimova

Professorial Lecturer at Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication, the George Washington University
Liliya Karimova received her Ph.D. in Communication from UMASS-Amherst. She is currently an independent researcher and a Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication at the George Washington University, Washington, DC. She has published in Nova Religio: the Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions; The Journal of Intercultural Communication Research; Central Asian Survey; Central Asian Affairs, Anthropology and Archaeology of Eurasia. Her research focuses on women, identity, piety, Islam, space, and discourse in Tatarstan, Russia.
Liliya Karimova

BY LILIYA KARIMOVA Kazan, Russia, has a rich history dating back to centuries before the Russian conquest in the 1550s. This history combines early pre-Islamic elements, a Muslim heritage that began with the conversion to Islam around the eight century,…

In Russia’s World War II Commemorations, the Holocaust Remains an Unexamined Narrative

In Russia’s World War II Commemorations, the Holocaust Remains an Unexamined Narrative

Izabella Tabarovsky

Izabella Tabarovsky

Senior Associate, Manager for Regional Engagement at The Kennan Institute
Izabella Tabarovsky's research interests focus on issues of historical memory and national reconciliation in the post-Soviet space and Eastern Europe. Prior to the Kennan Institute, she worked at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where she led the implementation of the Euro-Atlantic Security–Next Generation initiative (EASI Next Generation), managed a Track 2 Transnistria conflict resolution task force, and a U.S.-Russian health cooperation task force.
Izabella holds a Master of Arts degree in Russian History from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Colorado in Boulder. She is a native Russian speaker with working knowledge of Hebrew, Spanish, French, and German.
Izabella Tabarovsky

BY IZABELLA TABAROVSKY Читать по-русски A few years ago, two Russian teenagers appeared on a Russian TV show and, when asked about the Holocaust, guessed that it was wallpaper glue. After the ensuing handwringing in the media subsided, the journalist…

Забытый Холокост

Забытый Холокост

Izabella Tabarovsky

Izabella Tabarovsky

Senior Associate, Manager for Regional Engagement at The Kennan Institute
Izabella Tabarovsky's research interests focus on issues of historical memory and national reconciliation in the post-Soviet space and Eastern Europe. Prior to the Kennan Institute, she worked at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where she led the implementation of the Euro-Atlantic Security–Next Generation initiative (EASI Next Generation), managed a Track 2 Transnistria conflict resolution task force, and a U.S.-Russian health cooperation task force.
Izabella holds a Master of Arts degree in Russian History from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Colorado in Boulder. She is a native Russian speaker with working knowledge of Hebrew, Spanish, French, and German.
Izabella Tabarovsky

Изабелла Табаровски Read in English Уничтожение евреев на оккупированной территории СССР как часть Холокоста было проигнорировано в ходе торжеств по поводу победы России во Второй мировой войне  Несколько лет назад две российские студентки, принимавшие участие в телевикторине, отвечая на вопрос…

Bridging the Red-White Divide Is a Home Run for Putin

Bridging the Red-White Divide Is a Home Run for Putin

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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Latest posts by Maxim Trudolyubov (see all)

BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV In an event infused with historical and moral significance, His Holiness Patriarch Kirill, head of the Russian Orthodox Church, consecrated a church late last week that would commemorate the suffering of the Orthodox believers persecuted by the…

Russia’s Imaginary Stalin

Russia’s Imaginary Stalin

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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Latest posts by Maxim Trudolyubov (see all)

BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV Joseph Stalin, a Bolshevik who assumed dictatorial powers over the Soviet Union in the late 1920s and ruled until his death in 1953, is Russia’s most popular revolutionary. Stalin’s popularity as a historical figure is now at…