Russia’s Muslims Are as Diverse as Their Experiences

Russia’s Muslims Are as Diverse as Their Experiences

Liliya Karimova

Liliya Karimova

Professorial Lecturer at Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication, the George Washington University
Liliya Karimova received her Ph.D. in Communication from UMASS-Amherst. She is currently an independent researcher and a Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Organizational Sciences and Communication at the George Washington University, Washington, DC. She has published in Nova Religio: the Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions; The Journal of Intercultural Communication Research; Central Asian Survey; Central Asian Affairs, Anthropology and Archaeology of Eurasia. Her research focuses on women, identity, piety, Islam, space, and discourse in Tatarstan, Russia.
Liliya Karimova

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BY LILIYA KARIMOVA Russia’s current Muslim population is estimated at about 15 million, accounting for about 10 percent of the country’s total population. These numbers do not include about 4–5 million migrant workers, predominantly from Central Asia. A number of…

Russian Truck Drivers against the Platon Tax, Round 2

Russian Truck Drivers against the Platon Tax, Round 2

Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

Senior Researcher at Center for Independent Social Research
Irina Olimpieva works at the Center for Independent Social Research, St. Petersburg, Russia as a senior researcher and the Head of the Research Department “Social Studies of the Economy”. She received her PhD in Economic Sociology from the St. Petersburg State University of Economics and Finance. Her basic research interests are in the field of economic sociology with a particular focus on post-socialist transformation.
Irina Meyer (Olimpieva)

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The new round of truck drivers’ strike shows signs of politicization of economic protest in Russia BY IRINA MEYER (OLIMPIEVA) On March 27, Russia’s long-haul truck drivers announced an indefinite nationwide strike against the toll collection system Platon. The system…

Crimea As a Glimpse into a Post-American World

Crimea As a Glimpse into a Post-American World

Maxim Trudolyubov
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Maxim Trudolyubov

Senior Fellow at Kennan Institute
Maxim Trudolyubov, Senior Fellow with the Kennan Institute and editor-at-large with Vedomosti, has been following Russian economy and politics since the late 1990s. He has served as an opinion page editor for Vedomosti and editor and correspondent for the newspaper Kapital. He is the author of Me and My Country: A Common Cause (2011) and People Behind the Fence (2016). He won the Paul Klebnikov Fund’s prize for courageous Russian journalism in 2007, was a Yale World Fellow in 2009, and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2010-11.
Maxim Trudolyubov
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BY MAXIM TROBOLYUBOV One explanation for Russia’s president Vladimir Putin’s momentous decision, three years ago, to go into Ukraine and annex Crimea is that he sensed an opening. (March 18, 2014, is the date officially considered the day of admission…

Ya Heart Vladimir: A Visit to the Regions

Ya Heart Vladimir: A Visit to the Regions

Liz Malinkin

Liz Malinkin

Mary Elizabeth Malinkin is a Program Associate at the Kennan Institute of the Woodrow Wilson Center (2007-present). After graduating from Carleton College with a B.A. in history, she lived in Vladimir, Russia for two years and studied Russian language, literature, history, and politics at Vladimir State Pedagogical University. Ms. Malinkin received an M.A. in Russian and East European Studies at the University of Michigan after writing her thesis on ethnic minorities in the Moscow workforce. Her current research focuses on migration issues in Russia and Eurasia and her articles have appeared in Kennan Institute publications as well as The National Interest. She has participated in a US-Russia working group on migration, and in 2014 received an Advanced Practitioner Fellowship as part of the US-Russia Social Expertise Exchange.
Liz Malinkin

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By Mary Elizabeth Malinkin Giant, Cyrillic block letters spelling “Ya Heart Vladimir” (“I Love Vladimir”) now illuminate Cathedral Square in downtown Vladimir, Russia. The cheery, familiar slogan brought a smile to my face – da, ya lyublyu Vladimir. In early…

Conservatism as Preemptive Strike: The Case of Novosibirsk

Conservatism as Preemptive Strike: The Case of Novosibirsk

Anton Barbashin

Anton Barbashin

Anton Barbashin is a Managing Editor with Intersection online magazine, fellow with Center for Postindustrial Studies (Moscow), political scientist, graduate of Novosibirsk State University of Economics and Management
Anton Barbashin

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By Anton Barbashin Novosibirsk—Russia’s third largest city and the unofficial capital of Siberia—rarely makes international news. Apart from stories about Akademgorodok, a Soviet-built science city, sometimes called the “Silicon Forest,” the city was barely mentioned in the Western press until…

The Tin God behind the Ice Curtain: Observing the State in Russia’s Far East

The Tin God behind the Ice Curtain: Observing the State in Russia’s Far East

David Ramseur

David Ramseur

A former journalist, David Ramseur is writing a book on Alaska-Russian relations for the University of Alaska Press, scheduled for publication in Fall 2017. He worked to melt the Alaska-Russian “Ice Curtain” as a top aide to Alaska Governors Steve Cowper and Tony Knowles and U.S. Senator Mark Begich. Currently a visiting scholar in public policy at the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska Anchorage, Ramseur was a volunteer media advisor to Nizhny Novgorod Governor Boris Nemtsov in 1993.
David Ramseur

By David Ramseur Major A.H. Polosen was not smiling. The stern Border Guard officer – a member of the notorious Russian Federal Security Bureau (FSB) – boarded our bus in the remote Russian Bering Sea village of Lavrentiya demanding our…